Knowledgebase: E3
Boolean Search
Posted by Jack H. Ward on 16 January 2017 03:37 PM

A Boolean search allows the user to search for complicated expressions in text following the rules of Boolean logic. Boolean searches are applied both to Advanced searches and to Keyword searches.

Searching is performed by the rules of Boolean logic applied to text data inside units.

Unit - binary data file.

The following options are used for logical searches.

Functions must be written using all capital letters, otherwise they will be interpreted as part of your search.

 

FunctionMeaningExample
x AND y There is at least one x and at least one y in the unit.

Search parameters: a AND b

Possible search results:

  1. able
  2. black
  3. The file is big but there is no useful data there.

The following data will not be found:

  1. borrow
  2. any aim
  3. else
x OR y There is either at least one x or at least one y in the unit.

Search parameters: a OR b

Possible search results:

  1. borrow
  2. any aim
  3. black
  4. The file is big but there is no useful data there.

The following data will not be found:

  1. else
  2. No time left!
NOT x

There is no x in the unit.

In Keyword search, the NOT operator can be used only with the AND operator. I. e., you can find data that contains some text and doesn't contain some other text.

Search parameters: i AND NOT b

Possible search results:

  1. This is great!
  2. Time over.

The following data will not be found:

  1. blue blob of ink
  2. i remember
x NEAR /n y
(not available in Keyword search)

Selects documents containing specified search terms within close proximity to each other. There is x and y in the unit and there are not more than n symbols between them.

There must be a space between NEAR and the slash mark (not "NEAR/5", but "NEAR /5").

Search parameters: black NEAR /5 white

Possible search results:

  1. I like black-white films.
  2. One kitten is white and black.

The following data will not be found:

  1. The night is black. The snow a brilliant, glittering white.
  2. Black black bird.

By default, the priority of the operations is the following:

  1. NOT
  2. AND
  3. NEAR
  4. OR

Use brackets "()" to define other operations' priorities.

You need to put spaces before and after brackets. For Example, NOT ( cat OR dog ).

Use quotation marks to define the expression that should be found exactly as it is. For example: "e AND b" will find "white AND black", but will not find "to be". Please note, this feature is available only in regular searches.

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